Wednesday, July 15, 2009

X Planes

planeshots  nobody died! friday #20: “The Cornfield Bomber”  On Feb 2nd, 1970, a Convair F-106 Delta Dagger was found in a snow-covered Montana field, pilot-less, landing gear up, and with the engine still running - the melting snow causing the aircraft to slowly move forward…  The pilot - Captain Gary Faust - had earlier ejected from the aircraft at 15,000 feet when it entered a flat spin. Amazingly, the un-piloted aircraft then recovered, to make a gentle “belly-up” landing…  more info in the linkOne of my loves in life are aircraft, mostly military, but aircraft in general.  I get this from my dad who loved the aircraft he grew up with as a kid and couldn't read enough books on the subject of his heroes, men like Robin Olds, Dick Bong, Eddie Rickenbacker, Robert A. Hoover and of course Chuck Yeager.  As I was growing up in the 70's, I developed my own love of the aircraft if not the men who flew them.  The 70's was just after a great period of Supersonic development and the tactics and strategy of air defense underwent a wild developement where the powers felt that it needed to be really freakin' fast and haul missiles.  I identify with the "Century" jets more than any other out there, from the F-100 Super Saber to the truly knarly looking YF-107.  The other planes that were big news in those days were the "X Planes", the experimental aircraft that pushed the limits of what aeronotical engineers could do.  From Yeager's X-1 to the semi-spacey X-15 to the superfast X-51 Scramjet.  Why am I telling you this on a cowboy shooting blog?  Well I had to point as many people as I can to my new favorite blog, X Planes and I figured I should explain why I think it's so darned cool.

2 comments:

DirtCrashr said...

Eddie Rickenbacker! I remember seeing some great old photos of him when he was racing cars before WWI, at a Grand-Prix type circuit set up in downtown San Francisco - never knew they had such a thing...

Andrew B said...

thanks for the love